Stilgherrian (@stilgherrian)

Wentworth Falls NSW AU

The below is an off-site archive of all tweets posted by @stilgherrian ever

July 2nd, 2013

@sherro58 @paulwallbank Heh. I suspect they just got caught in the sunk cost fallacy. Started in pre-broadband days and had legacy code.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to sherro58

Here’s @amworldtodaypm’s story “Bungle prevents Mac users from lodging online tax returns” with my feelpinion. abc.net.au/pm/content/201…

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@aaronkearneyaus @mrgrumpystephen @ben_hr I can say without a shadow of doubt that I know fuck all about New Zealand music, 80s pop or not.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to aaronkearneyaus

Since we’re talking radio, I’ll re-plug the new Corrupted Nerds podcast episode with Sophos’ @SpawnRich explaining. corruptednerds.com/pod/conversati…

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@tonekee Thank you. Years and years of making live radio has its advantages. Also, @johjarvis01 would’ve edited me mercilessly.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to tonekee

RT @jeamland: If I ever get elected to Parliament I’m going to need to find a copy of Principia Discordia. [principiadiscordia.com Done.]

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@tonekee Heh. Yeah I was aware of that during the recording. I had a serious “Wait, where the fuck am I going with this?” moment.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to tonekee

@paulwallbank Well as long as @sherro58 doesn’t send an assassination team I should be OK.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to paulwallbank

RT @aaronkearneyaus: My word @stilgherrian sounds like Alan Brough on the radio [Really? I’m sometimes told I sound like @mrtonymartin.]

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RT @paulwallbank: Enjoying listening to @stilgherrian lambasting the ATO on @amworldtodaypm – steam engines for the masses! [Uhoh. Lambast.]

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RT @TomTilley .@AlboMP just told me live on air that Labor will make gay marriage happen in Australia. [For everyone. It’ll be compulsory.]

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I note that Saturday’s overnight minimum at Katoomba is forecast to be 0C, and Sunday’s -1C. This displeases me somewhat.

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Mobile: Check out of SEKRIT eyrie; obtain dinner-type food; train to Wentworth Falls, writing en route; do not freeze during the 2C night.

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@dananimal Thank you. You’re quite right, and I have fixified it.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to dananimal

Re-plug: UNSW “Data Sovereignty and the Cloud – A Board and Executive Officer’s Guide” launched todaycyberlawcentre.org/data_sovereign…Pud

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R: New (long) blog post: “Vodafone Australia’s new 4G network ain’t bad”, with speed tests etc. stilgherrian.com/internet/vodaf…

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@dobes I hate myself more than you can possibly imagine.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to dobes

@AFlanagan I’m not across how the specific glitches are being dealt with. @bengrubb is monitoring that. And @joshgnosis?

via Janetter for Mac in reply to AFlanagan

I am not playing with the ATO’s e-tax for Mac any more today because it looks like some alien thing has invaded my computer.

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Can I just say, @bengrubb @dobes @purserj @i38, that some of us can write Pascal and enjoy it. I was a fan of the Swiss school of coding.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to bengrubb

RT @christopherneal: Does just putting a space in work? [Nope, it appears I must have non-whitespace but not, say, a full stop. I cry.]

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Yes, @i386 @bengrubb, the thing looks like a Windows app from some years ago ported to Mac. It’s all wrong. It’s just all wrong.

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So then there’s this. Ahem. twitpic.com/d0cwyb

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Hahaha! When you enter the Tax File Number without spaces, it’s accepted… AND THEN REFORMATTED TO DISPLAY WITH SPACES! OH THE LULZ!

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But yes, @i386 @bengrubb, testing is hard. Hindsight etc. Still, they don’t seem to be “of the culture” of OS X development, I’d say.

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Really, @i386? Registering as an Apple dev is kinda How Things Are Done these days. Have the years passed the ATO by? @bengrubb

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i386 .@stilgherrian @bengrubb you can write that down to be a simple mistake. Releasing 1.0’s are difficult at the best of times.

via Twitter for Mac (retweeted on 4:11 PM, Jul 2nd, 2013 via Janetter for Mac)

I didn’t say arsehat on the radio. But I have said it on the radio previously. Well, arsehattery”, to be precise. abc.net.au/pm/content/201…

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You know, @bengrubb, they can’t have done a download-and-install test on a stock Mac, not a dev machine with security turned off. Arsehats.

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I will say on the radio, @jonoabroad, that these days you’d do it as a web app. Or do what I do, and get my accountant to do this shit.

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Well, @jonoabroad, when the ATO started on this 15 years ago, in dialup days, native apps were the go. But the world moved on…

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I believe I said something about cool-kid developers going to Silicon Valley to become billionaires, leaving government with the B Team.

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So, you paste your Tax File Number into e-tax for Mac, it’s too dumb to remove the spaces on its own. twitpic.com/d0cusz

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Oh this is hilarious.

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“E-tax for Mac launch stumbles on developer certificate”, as @joshgnosis put it. zdnet.com/au/e-tax-for-m…

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“ATO bungles e-tax for Mac launch”, as @bengrubb put it. smh.com.au/it-pro/governm…

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So @johjarvis01 just recorded my feelpinion on the ATO’s e-tax for Mac for @amworldtodaypm. I was not complimentary.

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Enjoying the afternoon, because it’s mostly letting all the ideas from this morning settling in my head. Like sediment.

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@MsLods Yeah I think this guide is more about what boards need to do now, based on current stuff. But I haven’t read it yet.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to MsLods

@MsLods No, didn’t come up in the discussion. Is it in the report? Suspect not, ‘cos it isn’t a thing yet.

via Plume for Android in reply to MsLods

@antloewenstein This is Eric Lowenstein, from Aon. The same?

via Janetter for Mac in reply to antloewenstein

Launched today: UNSW’s “Data Sovereignty and the Cloud – A Board and Executive Officer’s Guidecyberlawcentre.org/data_sovereign…Pud

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And that’s it. I’ll tweet one more tweet with a link to the report that was launched, and then I’ll have lunch.

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Wilson: Utility computing is the way forward, and that’s a better word than “cloud”. Make the complexity of PCs go away.

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Vaile: Surprised how mainstream things have become when they were once a bit feral. Privacy, self-incrimination, data breaches.

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Lawrence: Until after March 2014, we have no court interpretations of the new Privacy Act. It’s a key compliance issue.

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Lowenstein: Organisations don’t understand implications of having a privacy breach, particularly when data has gone offshore.

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Lowenstein: Surprised that so many organisations aren’t preparing for the Privacy Act changes in March 2014.

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Scroggie: [Rough paraphrase] I’m never surprised by anything with technology ‘cos we work with the people making it.

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Wilson is asking authors to reflect on what they think the state of play is.

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Wilson: People need to be more prudent, even with supposedly “low risk” data. Connections can be built up over time.

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Vaile: “This is a time bomb.” AU & EU law may handle this better ‘cos it’s about “reasonable likelihood” of identifying, not PII.

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Scroggie: Needs to be work on understanding what data sets can be used in this way.

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Q (me): Given how easy it is to re-identify data, are legislators and business aware? How will all this turn out in a generation.

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Vaile: The second inquiry should be very short and come back with an answer “Yeah, what we said last time.”

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Vaile is having a go at un-namewd “media interests” who wanted to say that privacy will kill journalism. [Who does me mean?]

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Q (@Davidramli): ALRC privacy inquiry just done, another similar one now launched, do we need another one? And timing?

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(There has also been some side comments about the re-identification of de-personalised data. Will cover that later.)

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Scroggie: Not all information is created equal, not all information has the same value. [So we’re back to risk analysis.]

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Wilson: Remember, though, that convenience is also about availability.

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Vaile: Remember that security is always a trade-off against convenience.

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Vaile: Key difference between AU and US law is “personally identifiable information” (PII) in US, “reasonable” stuff in AU.

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Scroggie: “Anything that can be engineered can be broken.” The answer is defence in depth.

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Wilson: That said, encryption is the first line of defence against privacy incursions. But what is the legal view?

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Wilson: Encryption is a magic word. Encrypted data has keys, keys must be managed. [I read this as “Risk changes, not vanishes”.]

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Q (Christopher Joye): What if your data is encrypted?

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Vaile: Offshoring of risk is one to watch.

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Vaile: Remember Dow Jones & Co. Inc. v Gutnick. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dow_Jones… “Internet? Schminternet!” Offshore your litigation!

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Vaile: Even the legal right to privacy legislation didn’t happen here in Australia. [Yet?]

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paulwallbank The clear message from the panel is that risk exists on and off the cloud, understand it and deal with it.

via Mobile Web (M5) (retweeted on 10:29 AM, Jul 2nd, 2013 via Janetter for Mac)

Vaile: Australia doesn’t have a Bill of Rights, etc, so the arguments used in US against NSA’s activities don’t work here.

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Lowenstein: Need to update your insurance to reflect changing legislative framework, particularly with data breach notification.

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Lawrence: But it’s a global issue. Countries working at different paces, hard to say how well we’re doing overall.

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Lawrence: Australia doing “pretty well” with privacy law, moving in the right direction with privacy, data breach notification.

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A (Lawrence): The law inevitably lags behind technology, but we’re also talking Australian law interfacing with others.

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Q (@ brettatitnews): Regulators seem reluctant to exert strong control over the industry. So what next? [Bad paraphrase, sorry.]

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Scroggie notes that a 3rd-party cloud provider might well be able to provide better security than you could do, and reduce risk.

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Vaile: Nothing much in report is affected. Scroggie: If NSA can’t keep data safe, then everyone needs to think about the risk.

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OK, someone has asked the question: What does this all mean now that we have these revelations about the NSA.

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Vaile notes that it’s not just the jurisdiction where the data sits but also the jurisdiction from which it is controlled.

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A (Vaile): There’s added complexity when a US company sets up an operating company in, say, Ireland. Jurisdiction is complicated.

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Lawrence: Whether the US can physically get access to the data held elsewhere is another question.

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A (Lawrence): Countries claim jurisdiction over their citizens and their activities wherever they act. US Patriot Act no diff.

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Q from @Stuartcorner on jurisdiction when US says it has jurisdiction on data held by US companies, no matter where it is.

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So now it heads into the Q&A portion of things. As usual, I’ll tweet highlights only.

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Also, everyone, I have been informed that there was an “official” hashtag (so look there too) but I’ll keep using

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3. Working with a local provider and hosting data locally can reduce risk, but not totally remove it.

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2. Not all clouds are created equal. Cost versus SLA versus etc etc.

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Scroggie’s three issues: 1. Confidence. We’re always only one disaster away from losing trust in cloud computing.

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Scroggie notes that investing in cloud computing isn’t always purely a technological decision.

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MT @jplonie: But do you always know where data is stored? Probably yes at the moment but… mostly because long haul bw costs.

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Insurance needs to define what cyber risks are (e.g. terrorism exclusions), and what the network is [in a BYOD world].

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But @havyatt! We have regulators! What will they do if they can’t regulate things?

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RT @havyatt: “@stilgherrian: many service providers don’t fit into existing regulatory categories ” Do they need to be regulated?

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Insurance can cover business interruption, but now need to include cost of data breach notifications, breach of IP etc.

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Lowenstein notes that there’s a big gap between conventional insurance programs and the emerging “cyber risks”.

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What sort of data risks? Brand reputation, share price, engagement with public; financial loss; increased regulatory scrutiny…

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Eric Lowenstein up now. Begins by noting there’s not many insurance products covering data risk. [I think he said that.]

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… Who can get access to a business’ data may have a huge impact on how the business can operate. Reiterates this happened fast.

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Lawrence: For some data this doesn’t matter. And for encrypted data, perhaps it doesn’t matter. But at the other end…

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Adrian Lawrence up now. States the obvious: the law that applies is the law of the land where the data is physically stored.

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There’s two versions of the report. Short version omits references and the survey of law across jurisdictions.

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Vaile: We’re not trying to go from blissful ignorance to blind panic in one jump. Some data, doesn’t matter where it is.

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Vaile: Data sovereignty has moved from nervous lawyer backroom stuff to mainstream business risk management in a couple of years.

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First up, David Vaile. Notes that digital privacy was once all about personal data, not business data. That was before the cloud.

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We’re now heading into the panel discussion, with speakers as tweeted earlier. Looks like it’s scheduled for one hour.

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It is launched! “Sovereignty and the Cloud – A Board and Executive Officer’s Guidecyberlawcentre.org/data_sovereign…Pud

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Chapman says the report is an “impressive forensic analysis” and “written with great clarity”, so I’d say he likes it.

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@adamson Hence a hashtag that people can filter out.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to adamson

@scott_thewspot What you say is true. But then the events have a social aspect, bringing together the people and the… breakfast.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to scott_thewspot

… and many privacy-protecting regulations were developed in a pre-internet age, let alone a pre-cloud age.

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Chapman notes that many service providers don’t fit into existing regulatory categories for communications providers…

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Much of what Champman is saying now is in the press release about the cloud regulation thingo that I just linked to.

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(That’s presumably as opposed to incoherent regulation, which might not be so good. Excellent.)

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Chapman pimps “Coherent regulation best for cloud services”, the ACMA’s recent discussion paper. acma.gov.au/theACMA/Newsro…

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Chapman sees the ACMA having a role in helping citizens navigate their way through the increasing use of cloud services.

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Chapman currently doing a “what the ACMA does” spiel. That’ll all be at the website, so I won’t tweet it. acma.gov.au

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Chris Chapman up now. Says his invite is recognition of the ACMA’s growing role in thought leadership in the networked society.

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2. What additional obligations am I taking on by putting my data in another juridiction? So that’s what the report is about.

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Wilson says there’s two questions when using cloud. 1. How do I know the data centre is meeting my Australian legal obligations?

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Wilson notes that originally the cloud symbol was the network, the internet in fact, so you couldn’t store data in it. Change!

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Stephen Wilson starts as moderator after desultory applause. He remembers when cloud symbol was first used in network diagrams.

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Hence, says, Scroggie, they’re interested in helping customers understand their obligations.

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Craig Scroggie introduces the day. Says NEXTDC does not sell cloud services, but makes big data centre into which clouds can go.

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We’ve been asked to take our seats. A beginning is imminent.

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Our moderator is Stephen Wilson, principal consultant at Lockstep Consulting. But right now it’s coffee and a light breakfast.

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Ring-ins are Craig Scroggie, CEO & executive director, NEXTDC; and Eric Lowenstein, client manager, Aon Financial Services Group.

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Authors are David Vaile, executive director UNSW Cyberspace Law & Policy Centre; and Adrian Lawrence, partner, Baker & McKenzie.

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Then there’s a panel discussion featuring the authors of the report and a couple ring-ins.

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Chris Chapman, Chairman and CEO of the Australian Media & Communications Authority (ACMA) will kick things off.

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I’m at the launch of the UNSW report “Data Sovereignty and the Cloud – A Board and Executive Officer’s Guideud seems a good tag.

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Harbour, with Quay, Bridge and dirty window instagram.com/p/bPc1dKCFlZ/

via Instagram

RT @jeamland Oh well, have this instead then: animalstalkinginallcaps.tumblr.com/post/543551499… [Oh just what I needed.]

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Mobile: Walk through the Sydney CBD to Circular Quay, and this Data Sovereignty and the Cloud event. I’ll tweet from there, probably.

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@jeamland What you say is true, but I’m not sure whether The Powers that Be (in this case @dobes) would want yet another cyber-NSA thing.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to jeamland

“iiNet slams ASIC’s IP-blocking notices”, writes @joshgnosis zdnet.com/au/iinet-slams…

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@jeamland Thanks for the suggestion for The Full Tilt, but haven’t I already done that one?

via Janetter for Mac in reply to jeamland

New (long) blog post: “Vodafone Australia’s new 4G network ain’t bad”, with speed tests etc. stilgherrian.com/internet/vodaf…

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Tue plan, draft: 0915 Data Sovereignty and the Cloud event; report on same for @CSO_Australia; errands; return to Wentworth Falls.

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It is Tuesday, apparently.

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