The 9pm Edict

The 9pm Edict is a podcast looking at the news and its frustrations. Series 1 of The 9pm Edict, a total of 20 episodes, was completed in March 2012. Since then, episodes have continued to appear for reasons that are not entirely clear.The world is not a just place, it seems.

Jill Charker from the Bureau of Statistics explains a census form to traditional dancer Peter Gurruwiwi in northeast Arnhem Land

The 9pm Edict cover art version 2, 150 pixelsIt’s that special day that comes but once every five years. Australia’s national Census 2016. And so far hasn’t it been a disaster.

“Look we don’t like to call it data mining, it’s more like data fracking,” tweeted by Johannes Jakob on 9 August, and he’s right.

This podcast was recorded as it was livestreamed on Tuesday night. Since then, we’ve discovered that a custard duck of fabulous proportions was unfolding in the background. Some comments herein may therefore seem a little dated.

You can listen to the podcast below. But if you want all of the episodes, now and in the future, subscribe to the podcast feed, or subscribe automatically in iTunes, or go to SoundCloud or Spreaker.

Play

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Photo of Census form, with a microphone in the foregroundTonight’s recording session of The 9pm Edict podcast will be streamed live from 2100 AEST via Spreaker.

You can listen right here. The widget immediately below currently shows all the episodes of the Edict uploaded to Spreaker. A “Live” button will appear when the broadcast starts.

You can also use the Spreaker apps (the listening apps, not the studio/production apps) or listen on The 9pm Edict‘s show page.

Tweet along using the hashtag #9pmlive.

A test transmission will start at 2055 AEST, five minutes before the program proper starts at 2100 AEST. Give or take.

[Photo: Photo of Census form, with a microphone in the foreground.]

Pauline Hanson

The 9pm Edict cover art version 2, 150 pixelsIt’s now 20 years since Pauline Hanson first entered the Australian parliament with her controversial views. Well now she’s back. At last Saturday’s federal election, Queensland voters propelled her into the Senate.

Hanson isn’t worried about just Asians these days. She’s targeting the supposed threat of Islam. And there’s more — much more — in the policy agenda of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation. It’s time to take a closer look.

In this special episode of the Edict, we go inside the mind of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation, as Stilgherrian reads their entire policy agenda — live. Every single word. You’ll also hear some of Pauline Hanson’s political wisdom in her own words.

Many thanks to this episode’s special guest host Carol Duncan.

You can listen to the podcast below. But if you want all of the episodes, now and in the future, subscribe to the podcast feed, or subscribe automatically in iTunes, or go to SoundCloud or Spreaker.

Play

Read the rest of this entry »

Photo of One Nation's policy flyer, with a microphone in the foregroundSaturday’s recording session of “The 9pm One Nation Policy Reading” will be streamed live from 2000 AEST via Spreaker.

You can listen right here. The widget immediately below currently shows all the episodes of the Edict uploaded to Spreaker. A “Live” button will appear when the broadcast starts.

You can also use the Spreaker apps (the listening apps, not the studio/production apps), or listen on The 9pm Edict’s show page.

If you want to read along at home, grab One Nation’s policy agenda. Tweet along using the hashtag #9pmlive.

A test transmission will start at 1945 AEST, a quarter of an hour before the program proper starts at 2000 AEST.

[Photo: Part of One Nation’s policy flyer, with a Sennheiser microphone in the foreground.]

Hero Image of distorted chartI’ve been analysing the time it takes to produce each episode of The 9pm Edict podcast, and the results are disturbing.

Well, they disturbed me.

The Short Version

Audio recording is a relatively small part of the process. My workflows are inefficient, because I’m always playing with the format rather than settling into a routine, let alone automating things.

On a personal note, lack of confidence sometimes slows the creative process. Thanks, brain. I also spend more time fussing over the audio mix than is probably warranted.

The time taken to produce each episode is usually 10x or even 20x longer than the finished podcast. The crowdfunded budget falls way short of proper compensation. And that doesn’t even take into account the time taken to do that crowdfunding.

The Long Version

What I just said, but with charts, and much more background information.
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[This literary tour de force will be streamed live from stilgherrian.com/edict/live4/, at Spreaker, and via Spreaker apps.]

Pauline Hanson on Channel Nine's Today, 3 July 2016On Saturday night, I’m recording and streaming live a special edition of The 9pm Edict podcast the likes of which you’ve never heard before. The voters of Australia are to blame. I need your help to undo some of the damage.

The 9pm Edict cover art version 2, 150 pixelsThe results of Australia’s federal election held last Saturday are not yet clear. One of the few certainties, however, is that Queensland’s voters have propelled the red-headed figurehead of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation into the Senate.

Senator Pauline Hanson. Get used to it, Australia.

One Nation’s full policy agenda isn’t just racist and anti-Islamic. Sure, it includes banning the burqa and niquab in public, banning halal certification, and a Royal Commission into Islam, but there’s much more.

How about scrapping all international treaties? Introducing Citizens Initiated Referenda, compensation for wind turbine syndrome, and euthanasia? Re-introducing trade tariffs? The list goes on.

Hanson is assertive. Treating her as just an amusing sideshow would be a mistake. She’ll push her party’s agenda in the Senate, so we’ll need to push back.

We need to understand.

We need to take a closer look.

We need to go inside the mind or Pauline Hanson’s One Nation.

Play

One Nation’s Policies Presented As They Should Be

This Saturday 9 July at 2000 AEST, I will start drinking Queensland’s own Bundaberg Rum and read to you, verbatim, the entire One Nation policy agenda. Every word.
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Photo of Malcolm Turnbull by Andrew Meares

With just 12 days left in Australia’s election campaign, Malcolm Turnbull judges his nuts. Rake’s Cleaver Greene notices a shift in the political rhetoric. And Nicholas Fryer offers some advice about… something or other.

In this episode, there’s talk of crime and murder, politics and peculiarities, Syria and squid.

You can listen to the podcast below. But if you want all of the episodes, now and in the future, subscribe to the podcast feed, or subscribe automatically in iTunes, or go to SoundCloud or Spreaker.

Play

If you’d like to comment on this episode, please add your comment below, or Skype to stilgherrian or phone Sydney +61 2 8011 3733.

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The 9pm Edict Public House Forum 3 being recorded

What is the proper position to assume in contemporary media? What is the best way to describe the discussion in this podcast?

This episode was recorded in front of a live audience at the Hurstville Ritz Hotel in Hurstville on Saturday 4 June 2016. There’s talk of satire, Tony Abbott, Donald Trump, Malcolm Turnbull, refugees, cartoons, BuzzFeed, human rights.

The panellists are, in order of introduction:

  • Mark Humphries, comedy writer and performer for SBS TV’s The Feed, ABC TV’s News Breakast, The Chaser Quarterly, and formerly of The Roast.
  • Cathy Wilcox, cartoonist for the Sydney Morning Herald.
  • Paul Wallbank, writer, broadcaster and troublemaker covering business and tech. Described as ‘brain damaged’ by the Australian Prime Minister.
  • Margot Saville, freelance writer, Sydney correspondent for Crikey, author of The Battle for Bennelong.

You can listen to the podcast below. But if you want all of the episodes, now and in the future, subscribe to the podcast feed, or subscribe automatically in iTunes, or go to SoundCloud.

Play

If you’d like to comment on this episode, please add your comment below, or Skype to stilgherrian or phone Sydney +61 2 8011 3733.

Read the rest of this entry »

Screenshot of The 9pm Edict being recordedToday’s recording session of The 9pm Edict’s Public House Forum will now be streamed live from 1400 AEST.

As before, I’ll be using Spreaker, a streaming audio platform.

You’ll be able to listen right here on this web page using the widget immediately below (which shows all the episodes of the Edict uploaded to Spreaker so far). A “Live” button will appear when the broadcast starts.

[Update 5 June 2016: The recording has been done. The Spreaker player currently shows the raw recording. You’ll have to skip in 45 min 45 sec to get to the actual program. This will be replaced with the final edited version later today on Monday.]

You can also use any of the various Spreaker apps (the listening apps, not the studio/production apps), or presumably listen on the The 9pm Edict’s show page at Spreaker.

You’ll be able to tweet along using the Twitter hashtag #9pmlive.

I’ll have some sort of test transmission running from 1345 AEST, so a quarter of an hour before the program proper starts at 1400 AEST.

[Update 4 June 2016: This podcast recording session will now be streamed live via Spreaker from 1400 AEST.]

Hurstville Ritz Hotel: click for Eventbrite pageThe 9pm Edict cover art version 2, 150 pixelsWould you like to witness the recording of yet another very special episode of The 9pm Edict podcast? Then organise yourself to be at the third Public House Forum this Saturday 4 June.

Once more I’m recording a forum in a public house — yes, a pub — where several interesting people will join me to discuss the important issues of the day.

The panel:

  • Mark Humphries, comedy writer and performer for SBS TV’s The Feed, ABC TV’s News Breakast, The Chaser Quarterly, and formerly of The Roast.
  • Cathy Wilcox, cartoonist for the Sydney Morning Herald.
  • Paul Wallbank, writer, broadcaster and troublemaker covering business and tech. Described as ‘brain damaged’ by the Australian Prime Minister.
  • Margot Saville, freelance writer, Sydney correspondent for Crikey, author of The Battle for Bennelong.

The podcast itself will be a lot like the first one or the second one.

The venue is the Hurstville Ritz Hotel, 350 Forest Road, Hurstville NSW 2220. The podcast recording starts at 2pm — but I strongly recommend that you arrive well before that, so you can order lunch and a few beverages and get into the mood.

Space is limited, so you’ll need to book a (free) ticket through Eventbrite. Do it now.

[Photo: Hurstville Ritz Hotel, photographed on 29 May 2016.]

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