Stilgherrian (@stilgherrian)

Wentworth Falls NSW AU

The below is an off-site archive of all tweets posted by @stilgherrian ever

August 19th, 2013

@SnarkyPlatypus Bonsoir. Il a été un long et compliqué jour. Et vous?

via Janetter for Mac in reply to SnarkyPlatypus

@aqualung @joannejacobs @paulwallbank @hollingsworth @702sydney Occam’s Razor and also trusting one’s own gut feelings.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to aqualung

@joannejacobs @aqualung @paulwallbank @hollingsworth @702sydney If self-serving propaganda figures seem wrong, the simplest explanation…?

via Janetter for Mac in reply to joannejacobs

@paulwallbank @aqualung @hollingsworth @702sydney Yes, and these fucktards will be running the world that will support us in our twilight.

via Twitter for Windows Phone in reply to paulwallbank

@aqualung @hollingsworth @paulwallbank @702sydney Whine whine they see it in America before I can. Yes, IT’S AN AMERICAN PROGRAM.

via Twitter for Windows Phone in reply to aqualung

@aqualung @hollingsworth @paulwallbank @702sydney It’s neither. It’s a spoiled impatient self-entitled cunt issue. They can bloody wait.

via Twitter for Windows Phone in reply to aqualung

Note to self, a book title: “Taxonomy of Annoying Hairdressers”.

via Twitter for Windows Phone

If you arsehats think I’m going to trawl back through all those tweets and figure out what you’re talking about, you’re deranged.

via Twitter for Windows Phone

That’s it for me from the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit. I’ll be back tomorrow. gartner.com/technology/sum…

via Janetter for Mac

Thank you. We are done. I’m reporting and analysing the privacy stuff from for @technologyspec on Thursday.

via Janetter for Mac

SHUT UP CROMPTON YOU HAVE ALREADY GONE OVER TIME AND THEY HAVE STARTED SERVING THE DRINKS WHAT IS WROGN WITH YOU.

via Janetter for Mac

… so the Privacy Commissioner will probably start issuing guidance notes on interpreting the laws.

via Janetter for Mac

Last Q: How do we know how secure we need to keep different kinds of data? A: We don’t yet know what “serious” breach is…

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Problem: every single jurisdiction wants to write its own privacy laws in its own ways, making life difficult for global firms.

via Janetter for Mac

Questions of whether data identifies a person or a device are likely to be irrelevant when doing business in Australia.

via Janetter for Mac

… where under Australian law, it’s anything form which you can reasonably identify a person. Data agregators beware!

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Key difference from US law, where personally identifiable information (PII) is usually a specific set of named fields…

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Q: What about cloud? A: It’s just outsourcing with more links. APP8 says if you do nothing to ensure privacy then you’re liable.

via Janetter for Mac

Crompton suggest Privacy Commissioner will be looking hard at government, telcos, banks and health.

via Janetter for Mac

Q: What is the motivation for companies to move on this? A: Fines, but also news-headline reputation damage.

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Audience Q: Penalties for breaching privacy principles? A: Significantly greater: make-good costs and fines up to $1.7 million.

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Getting privacy right is therefore vital, ‘cos customers can more elsewhere easier than every before.

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Default privacy setting should be what normal society expects them to be, not what the organisation wants, or there’ll be pain.

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I’ll post Crompton’s list of lessons learned from Google Buzz on stilgherrian.com on Wednesday, probably.

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Crompton says Google Buzz is an example of “designed by geeks for geeks”, public when “You did WHAT?”

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RT @NewtonMark: And the notion that someone can be “liable” for a thought is just totally detached from reality. [I paraphrase. ]

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MT @NewtonMark: The possibility of “thought ownership” is a creepy symptom of extreme intellectual property absolutist mindset.

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RT @gusworldau: Guessing that the #2 “irrelevant processes” are the credit info changes. [Correct. ]

via Janetter for Mac

Crompton says systems will have to follow Privacy By Design principles. privacybydesign.ca

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Australia’s current Privacy Commissioner calls this “The Bedrock Principle”. Something goes wrong, and no policy? You’re done.

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3. The sleeper, Australian Privacy Principle number one (APP1). Organisations must have a transparent info handling policy.

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2. Various processes that “aren’t of interest to you in this room”.

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1. Privacy Commissioner may investigate etc without their having been a complaint. Lots of new powers.

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Australia’s new Privacy Act, in force from 12 March 2014, introduces three big key changes.

via Janetter for Mac

The fuzziness of the boundaries are a security challenge, and privacy too. What may you know about a worker? What can’t you?

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In this scenario, asks Crompton, if you have a thought, is it a work thought or a non-work thought? Who owns it? Who’s liable?

via Janetter for Mac

Even in our own heads, we mix work mode and then may tweet a personal comment on that. The boundary? Do we consciously know?

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Boundaries are shifting, says Crompton. “Work” is no longer a place and time. We work anywhere, any time, mingled with non-work.

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Crompton never asks for a show of hands of who fills in every online form truthfully. One always will, and then be embarrassed.

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Crompton: Security is about protection and control of personal data, but privacy is then about controlling its access and use.

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In NZ, data breached by govt are headline news. Australia can be no better. We’re one high-profile breach from NZ situation.

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Crompton: Personal information about Americans is lost at the rate of 1 in 3 of the population each year: 100 million records.

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What kind of liability? Data breaches. Or loss of reputation if public don’t like what you’re doing with their data.

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If holding personal info is an asset, it can also become a liability. Public is “bone-ignorant” of what you’re doing with it.

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However, says Crompton, we’ve no mature understanding of how to manage those personal-data assets. Trust is key differentiator.

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Crompton cites a prediction that “personal data will be the new oil, a valuable resource of the 21st century.

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Crompton riffs off “Target can tell you’re pregnant” yarn (he said KMart), looking for correlation only. Causality irrelevant.

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So in that scenario, when facts from two datasets are merged to create an inference, who created that new fact?

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Crompton: Data is now an asset, generated en masse from mobile devices, stored in the cloud, and aggregated by many firms.

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Crompton says IIS provides “strategic privacy services”. Their existence represents a shift in view on privacy.

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The keynote by Malcolm Crompton, former Australian Privacy Commissioner, now managing director IIS, is beginning.

via Janetter for Mac

@gusworldau Look, that’s enough from you, you so-called “journalist” and your fancy-pants “facts”.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to gusworldau

HamishBarwick The most common form of password storage is a Post It note- Cochlear’s Craig Davies.

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 5:19 PM, Aug 19th, 2013 via Janetter for Mac)

@chrisjrn Whenever I’ve been in either of them, I had trouble hearing my companion, and I still have great hearing. YMMV. [Shrugs.]

via Janetter for Mac in reply to chrisjrn

RT @semibogan: No. Broadway is hell. [This is what I imagined. I shall head to Wynyard for next Monday’s meeting then.]

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RT @engochick: Stop being such an old cranky person. [In further news, @engochick demands that water flow uphill.]

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Are there any decent coffee shops near UTS that aren’t FULL OF EXTREMELY LOUD-TALKING STARTUP PEOPLE AND STUDENTS?

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RT @MsLods: Yes, the new privacy provisions start on 12 March 2014 oaic.gov.au [Cheers, thanks. ]

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RT @SymantecANZ: Join us on the booth this evening for a wine and cheese tasting [Look, this is how you should tweet, people!]

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Gartner presenters who tell people they need [mumbled] SIEM without telling them what SIEM is.

via Janetter for Mac

RT @jasonlangenauer: How about this as a starting point for your business card? mattcutts.com/blog/the-best-… [Agreed, a good possibility.]

via Janetter for Mac

“Cyber security economics like a Ponzi scheme: Gartner”, writes @HamishBarwick computerworld.com.au/article/524067…

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RT @ncraike: Stop blaming old women for your clipboard problems! [Oh. Fair point. It’s usually young men who cause my problems. No wait.]

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“The CISO shouldn’t be the defender of security: Gartner”, writes @mukimu zdnet.com/the-ciso-shoul…

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Dear Chrone, when I select text in a browser window, press command-C, the menu flashes, the text is meant to go into the clipboard kthxbai.

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RT @mukimu: Piece of paper with your name on it ;) [True, since it is a globally unique identifier. So far…]

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I need a business card so I can enter the raffles at conferences. Why should proles get all the fun?

via Twitter for Windows Phone

akent @stilgherrian If I were iiNet I would have doubled the ‘m’ to make it “instagrammable”. One ‘m’ looks weird. </pedant>

via Janetter for Mac (retweeted on 4:27 PM, Aug 19th, 2013 via Twitter for Windows Phone)

Thanks, @TimdeSousa @sroc, I’ll tweet out the links shortly.

via Tweetbot for iOS in reply to TimdeSousa

Apple’s Calendar app for iPad is shit. What do actual busy people with complex schedules use?

via Tweetbot for iOS

@iain_chalmers @technologyspec Sir, I always Twitterpimp my yarns! Also, if you miss the tweet, my Weekly Wrap posts every Sunday.

via Tweetbot for iOS in reply to iain_chalmers

@davedittrich @Beaker @George_Kurtz Thanks for that, Dave. I’ll check it out once I’ve done being Gartnerised.

via Tweetbot for iOS in reply to davedittrich

@Gwyntaglaw Crompton said he suspects that even the Europeans proposing such a right don’t even know what they mean by it.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to Gwyntaglaw

There is now some non-tweetable stuff in my schedule, through to when Malcolm Crompton does the closing keynote at 1715 AEST

via Janetter for Mac

Crompton: Pre-internet, all info was private until you took action to publish. On the internet, it’s public unless you protect.

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There’s a complex discussion of “the right to be forgotten” at the moment.

via Janetter for Mac

I’m reporting on this discussion for @technologyspec, @iain_chalmers, probably published Thursday.

via Janetter for Mac

Crompton: Note that some companies have critical privacy information in the Terms & Conditions, not the Privacy POlicy.

via Janetter for Mac

The first question you’ve got to answer is decide what your approach is. Best practice for customers? Defend your use of data?

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With changes to the rules, how should companies approach the writing of their privacy policies? Crompton: Start again.

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Well, seven journalists officially, but in practical terms some of them are more useless than others.

via Janetter for Mac

Sorry, @sroc suggests the new Privacy Act provisions start 12 March 2014, not 1 March 2014. Please check for yourselves.

via Janetter for Mac

I’ve stopped tweeting this discussion for the moment ‘cos it’s a complex little discussion with just five journalists.

via Janetter for Mac

New Privacy Commissioner will have the ability to take action even if no-onr has complained yet.

via Janetter for Mac

Crompton: Mobile phone industry over-exploited personal info, there was a backlash, so if anyone does it again it’s their fault.

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Crompton: 15y ago, people glazed over when privacy issues mentioned, today they all have a Facebook story. It’s a global debate.

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McMillan: Companies that already respect privacy and have processes likely to transition well. [And the reverse.]

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Crompton: We’re just over half-way through the implementation timeframe, some [many? check recording] companies haven’t started.

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Gartner rep is Rob McMillan, local Gartner security research director.

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Cromptom: Security is about having info under control, privacy is about exercising that control. Privacy not about security.

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Gartner rep (name to follow) says this has security implications, and the solutions aren’t purely technical.

via Janetter for Mac

Key issues are that Act-following companies must have a privacy program, and rules on sending data offshore are tighter.

via Janetter for Mac

Former Australian Privacy Commissioner is outlining the changes to the Privacy Act that come into force on 1 March 2014.

via Janetter for Mac

Up now, a media roundtable on changes to Australia’s privacy law, not on the public program.

via Janetter for Mac

@chort0 Thanks for the heads-up, I’ll check that FBI bulletin before filing any related stories.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to chort0

How many kiwi fruit mini-pavlovas should I have for lunch?

via Janetter for Mac

Reminder, Mon and Tue I’m tweeting from Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit. gartner.com/technology/sum… Filter out to avoid.

via Janetter for Mac

@Beaker I shall try, and if I don’t catch him again I’ll work it into a story.

via Twitter for Windows Phone in reply to Beaker

Girard’s closing message is that you keep concentrating on the basics. He has specific recommendations, which I’ll post later.

via Janetter for Mac

Girard: If you don’t focus on the right threats, people will come in through your cyberdoors. Cyberdoors! Drink!

via Janetter for Mac

Girard says harm of cybersecurity is that you diffuse your spending onto the wrong threat focus. A safeguard imbalance.

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Girard: Mentions Tempest screen-readers and HERF weapons (they went rogue?). Rogue projects can end up beign funding for crime.

via Janetter for Mac

Girard: There’s a lot of money floating around, so controversial government projects can go rouge with secret finding.

via Janetter for Mac

Girard notes Microsoft has one of the most open and well-developed vulnerability disclosure and secure development regimes.

via Janetter for Mac

Girard: Cooperating with government requests raises client privacy, competitive advantage and reputation risks.

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Girard: Sharing this kind of cyberdefence information is not really well-funded. Government offices are closed after hours.

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Girard: Private organisations asked to supply information to government entities but getting nothing back are disadvantaged.

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Girard: Government operations are thinking more in terms of warfare and defence postures, thinking more in military terms.

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Girard also points out that it’s illegal, so I presume that’s, you know, a secondary consideration.

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Girard: “Don’t attack back if you’re a private organisation.” It’s like escalating a drunken fight in a bar.

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Girard: “Active defence” (i.e. attacking back) like H B Gary and CrowdStrike, is only really an option for government.

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Girard: Walking around with iPads with passwords is obviously a bad idea, but that doesn’t make it a counter-terrorism issue.

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Girard: State-sponsored attacks are an issue for government agencies etc, but not necessarily for regular enterprises.

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Girard: A good attack with be hard to catch, and it’ll be hard to find out the true IP address. So don’t launch an attack.

via Janetter for Mac

Girard: State-sponsored attacks are really advanced attacks, but if they’re really advanced then you’re not detecting them.

via Janetter for Mac

Girard explains that attacks from, say, Romania or Bulgaria are unlikely to be state-sponsored, but about criminal activity.

via Janetter for Mac

Girard shows a graph of where attacks come from, warns state of origin doesn’t equal state-sponsored. Gartner charts.

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Girard: State-sponsored technical spying isn’t new, cites The Thing of 1945. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thing_(li…

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Girard: … counterfeit doesn’t always mean there’s a back door, and back doors are not limited to the creators.

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Girard: Supply chain integrity is an issue. Almost exclusively state-sponsored threat, but…

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Your comments are noted, @Beaker @snare, and shall be incorporated.

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Girard just slightly mis-stated the ASD (formerly DSD) Top 4 Mitigations. Note to self: check the recording.

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Girard: Macquarie Dictionary: “cyber… popularly used to indicate a connection with computers… internet and virtual reality”

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Girard: Asks room if cybersecurity is just a new name for info security. 60% of hands go up. “OK, you can leave, you’re done.”

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Girard: Asks room if they think cybersecurity is “mostly” about protecting critical infrastructure. A few hands are raised.

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Girard: Asks the room if they think cybersecurity is “mostly” attacks from foreign government. No hards are raised.

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Girard: Once you start buying into cybersecurity services or products, you’ll be shamed out of taking the risk of stopping.

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Girard has on-screen now a photo of Charles Ponzi. His scheme was about promises of wealth but you had to keep buying into it.

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Girard: Most “cybersecurity” is hype. There’s a very narrow and small subset of “cybersecurity” that is valid and new.

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Girard: Cyber is the hot topic, we must defend against everything. But almost everything you’ve heard is likely wrong.

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Sorry, name substitution. Next up is “CyberSecurity! The biggest scam since the Ponzi scheme” by John Girard.

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Given the headline for this session, I am shocked, shocked I tell you, to find other journalists in this room.

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Next up: “CyberSecurity! The biggest scam since the Ponzi scheme” with Mark Nicolett.

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Byrnes’ recommendations: 4. Establish relationships with federal and state law enforcement agencies and industry consortia.

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Byrnes’ recommendations: 3. Design OT situational awareness into existing security monitoring operations.

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Byrnes’ recommendations: 2. Monitor and apply OT security regulatory frameworks into IT security frameworks.

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Byrnes’ recommendations: 1. Align and integrate OT security process with IT security process, adjusting organisation as needed.

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Byrnes: Gartner resisted using the “cyber security” term until it became inevitable.

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Byrnes: And some of these systems still run on Windows 3.1. Regulators tiold them, um, we didn’t mean don’t patch.

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Byrnes: Healthcare-providing systems can’t be changed without approvals, was (wrongly) interpreted to mean no security patching.

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Byrnes: All these networks are Operational Technology (OT), already out there, connected to the internet, and not secure.

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Byrnes: Everything moving to internet. “All of our processes. All of your actions. And you’ll be responsible for securing it.”

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Byrnes: “Physical security and information security have merged… now it’s impossible to separate them.” Network security cams!

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@susan_m We’ll have to catch up some time! Meanwhile, I’ll assume @emkeeno is totally flat chat, but we’ll see.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to susan_m

Byrnes: “In many companies, IT doesn’t even know these network devices exist.”

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Byrnes: “Today, more than half of the connections on the internet are not people.” Think air conditioning, cameras, etc

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Byrnes: “The internet used to just be about conveying information, and some of it was useful.”

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Byrnes: “The medical devices that we have in our bodies don’t have security, but they are communicating.” We haven’t learned.

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Byrnes speaks of a “facility” that nearly lost its business license ‘cos of a breach in a system they didn’t realise they had.

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@susan_m I assume you’re in the building somewhere?

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Constantly amazed by how much the corporate world runs on emailed .ics calendar files. There’s an attack vector worth exploring.

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@badm0f0 I am in furious agreement with you.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to badm0f0

Or, “How we learned to cyber all the things.”

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Next up: “Cyber Security for the Internet of Everything” by F Christian Byrnes.

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Session over. Coffee break.

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@christopherneal If you’re in the room, grab me. I’m sitting to the left of the pillar by the drinks table.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to christopherneal

“How many organisations can detected within a week that they’ve been breached?” “None?”

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Dear Speakers, stop mumbling the acronym that you haven’t explained yet. Please tell us what the heck you’re talking about.

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My tweet about non-new messages having to be hammered into people was just read out on stage. Approval from white-shirt man.

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There’s a point in here, that organisations won’t be able to keep secure relying only on its own data. Speaker unidentified.

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I think “big data” has become an Emperor’s clothes thing. No-one wants to admit that they can’t see any difference from “data”.

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The term “big data” has not been defined, except to say that “it’s about trends, it’s about velocity”.

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We’re being asked whether through 2016, 80% of organisations will fail to make “big” security data useful.

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MT @sarah_j_smith: Email: “Hey, gimme your password”, <delete>, “Really - gimme your password”, “Oh, OK - here you are” ==

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I also notice that I prefer to use Twitter as my notebook, rather than the open document window on my screen.

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I have mixed feelings about this session. There’s little new emerging, but then these messages need to hammered into people.

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A shambolic deployment of coloured cardboard tells us most delegates won’t reveal their confidence levels in their own security.

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We’re learning that “these advanced persistent threats (APTs) aren’t particularly advanced”. Drink!

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These terms have not been defined, and no numbers are being presented to support these feelpinions.

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By 2018, will financial motives still be the main driver for 70% of attacks? Andreas [?] says more fight for moral high gound.

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We’re now heading into a panel discussion on the future of threats. As far as I can see, the program doesn’t list the speakers.

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ben_hr How good is email as a medium for threaded conversations? Pretty good hey.

via Tweetbot for iOS (retweeted on 10:33 AM, Aug 19th, 2013 via Janetter for Mac)

Please, Gartner, you wouldn’t hire actors as company executives, so don’t have executives do acting jobs.

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@docbaty I had that very question in mind, but didn’t tweet it. It’ll certainly find its way into what I’ll be writing later this week.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to docbaty

“By 2014, 80% of companies will report security issues annually to their board.” Show of hands in the room, about 40%.

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“Why do executives keep getting compromised? They click on the dancing pigs.” Stop the pigs.

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“Only 8% of organisations are using next-generation firewalls.” IT was not explained they must have them. Magic words.

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@ModSecurity Have you got anyone at this Gartner event in Sydney today?

via Janetter for Mac in reply to ModSecurity

“Risk posture is a choice,” he said. And my mind added, “So assume the position.”

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Scenarios 1 and 2 are outright government-to-government cyberwar, and anarchic hackergeddon respectively

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Now, with the version of history having been presented, we get the four-scenario framing of the next ten years.

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@ModSecurity Ah, it was mod_security that told me they were happening. You didn’t scroll back far enough. I’ve already plugged you. ;)

via Janetter for Mac in reply to ModSecurity

That’s not a criticism of Gartner. They’re delivering the message that they’ve determined business still needs to hear.

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“We can keep people off social media about as much as we can stop people from breathing.” Um, yes. Is business this far behind?

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According to the VU meter on my recorder, that video was at least 40dB louder than the speakers’ current amplification.

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OK, this play-acting has a message. Each new threat delivery vector demanded a “Reset” [event subtitle] of How Things Were Done.

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Ah, so we’re explaining how the field is changing, starting off with floppy discs that could be infected with viruses.

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You know, @mukimu, one day corporate event managers will realise we think their opening videos are lame and stupid.

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Keynote session kicking off with @peproctor and a message that security is becoming more about people than technology.

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I’m at Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit in Sydney. gartner.com/technology/sum… Filter out to avoid my valuable thoughts.

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It begins. Tedious and predictable corporate video is tedious and predictable and TOO FUCKING LOUD.

via Janetter for Mac

The view from the only seat at the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit with 240V instagram.com/p/dLEV3ACFpN/

via Instagram

The view from the only seat at the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit with 240V instagram.com/p/dLEV3ACFpN/

via Instagram

@smperris The two halves of that sentence are mutually exclusive.

via Twitter for Windows Phone in reply to smperris

jendudley Disturbingly realistic spam from the “ATO” this morning. Be safe, everyone. pic.twitter.com/nGPQFDm5X5

via Falcon-Pro (retweeted on 8:38 AM, Aug 19th, 2013 via Janetter for Mac)

Also, @smperris, I can recommend the Wordfence security plugin for WordPress. It must be good, it has so many options I cry.

via Janetter for Mac

Thanks, @Tuna @gattaca @BlogsofWar, seems the WordPress brute-force is a big thing. Inevitable, given 19% of all websites are WordPress.

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@smperris In my case it’s the mod_security plug-in for Apache, a web application firewall monitoring HTTP requests.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to smperris

@joshrowe Yes, wordpress.com has a “two-step” authentication, and there’s various plug-ins for self-hosted WordPress.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to joshrowe

Fairfax Media’s hangout with Malcolm Turnbull is at 12.30 AEST today.
smh.com.au/federal-politi…

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Look, if a saucepan full of nails is a weapon of mass destruction, then of course a journalist is terrorism. You don’t understand words.

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RT @Andrew_Zammit: Sydney Morning Herald - Right-wing preferences have Pauline Hanson in with chance: smh.com.au/federal-politi… [Ah such fun!]

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I am seeing a LOT more brute-force password attacks on WordPress sites over the last week or so. US data centre. Is that reflected globally?

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@darrenpauli Indeed. If we should be permitted to drink together, that is. These things have a habit of going very, very wrong.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to darrenpauli

@darrenpauli @iTnews_au Oh, that’s warm compared with the Blue Mountains. Well, I plan to be down for Breakpoint and Ruxcon.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to darrenpauli

@prestontowers Ah! The train is a metal box full of 3G/4G and Wi-Fi devices, and there’s more at this time. It’s an electromagnetic mess.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to prestontowers

@darrenpauli Are you in Sydney for the Gartner gig today?

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RT @darrenpauli: Snowden downloaded NSA secrets while working for Dell, sources say reuters.com/article/2013/0… [Check the tracking number.]

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@prestontowers Here’s something though. I use the Sierra Wireless hotspot. telstra.com.au/internet/downl… Something causing Wi-Fi dropouts.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to prestontowers

@lewellyn @SnarkyPlatypus Oh lovely. And she looks like a cocktail maker who knows her way around those shelves. Also, celery.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to lewellyn

@emmackat Ah hi then! I’m upstairs in the rear car 8061.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to emmackat

@prestontowers Well, just past Doonside we hit a patch of 12s to 20s packet lag, but it looked like normal cell-switching routing ambiguity.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to prestontowers

@SnarkyPlatypus Do please pass on to @lewellyn my best regards, and eternal thanks for introducing to Vesuvio and the other one.

via Janetter for Mac in reply to SnarkyPlatypus

@prestontowers We shall soon see. I had shitty packet lag on a Telstra 3G dual-channel connection between Emu Plains and Penrith.

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@GordyPls Ah yes, you are indeed to blame for the cloud running out of electricity. Mind you, I’ve got 1 x 4G and 4 x Wi-Fi devices on me.

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If you wish to avoid my high-volume Twitterstream from the Gartner gig, filter out the hashtag from 0900 AEST through to dusk.

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Mon plan: 0650 train to Sydney (now); Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit all day gartner.com/technology/sum…; return to mountains (?).

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And now for the “high” speed express run from Penrith to Parramatta.

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@markatextor And then there’s echoes of what @johnmcternan and I discussed yesterday about wanting to change. Too much for a Monday, Mark!

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RT @sylmobile: We need an infographic. [… like a fish needs a bicycle?]

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Ah, ASIC tells me that my dormant business name “Skank Media” is due for renewal, just as I’m planning some media projects. It’s a sign.

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@markatextor Chaos theory makes sense. I saw something on opinion-formation & “influence” BS, said it’s more like magnetic domains aligning.

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“Coalition would adopt ‘cloud first’ policy”, writes @alliecoyne itnews.com.au/News/353668,co… HT @juhasaarinen

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@markatextor Meanwhile, an ex-Australian Army officer, Dr David Kilcullen, is applying UX principles to urban design. caerusassociates.com/team/david-kil…

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@markatextor Oh thanks, that looks like a great reader. I’m looking a lot at the long-term perspective lately.

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@markatextor As an aside, my barber said the other day that this is the first election he can recall where no-one talked to him about it.

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Thank you @sylmobile @monsoontrader for your kind reviews of “Corrupted Nerds” on iTunes. itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/cor…

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New photo: “Sunrise over the valley”, at Wentworth Falls. flickr.com/photos/stilghe…

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@markatextor @technologyspec There’s faint praise! ;) But yes, there’s a reason I’ve tuned out of the 24/7 news sushi train.

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Mobile: Taxi to Wentworth Falls; 0650 train to Central; train to Town Hall; walk to Hilton Sydney hotel by 0900.

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@markatextor @technologyspec Thanks, Mark. Last week was my most solid output since a depression bout, and I’m happy with the quality too.

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And a final plug for my “The real numbers behind cyberhype” at @technologyspec businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8…

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A final plug for my “Prepare for the attack of the politiclones!” at @zdnetaustralia ‘cos it amused me zdnet.com/prepare-for-th…

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From ABC @RNSundayExtra, @johnmcternan and me talking future politics with @GreenJ (13 mins audio) stilgherrian.com/conversations/…

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Me at @ABCthedrum, Friday: “‘Literally’ purists literally belong in the stone age” plus, um, comments. abc.net.au/news/2013-08-1…

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Since the cab doesn’t arrive for another 15 minutes, I might re-pimp some stuff that I’ve done recently.

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While catching the 0650 train is no earlier than when I normally start work, it’s way before I’m usually wearing pants.

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Mon plan, draft: 0650 train to Sydney; Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit all day gartner.com/technology/sum…; return to mountains (?).

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@chrisbrownie Hello, yes, at least this quarter of the internet is empty. Are we really missing much?

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Hello Monday, 0430 AEST. I need to be awake now to get stuff done before catching the 0650 train to Sydney. Please pass the alkaloids.

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